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Iris Fulva- Copper Iris

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The Iris Fulva is commonly called the “copper iris” because of the lovely copper color of its flower petals. Each delicate petal has a crease down the center, which makes them resemble arched leaves. And, unlike other types of irises, there are six p

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Iris Fulva-Copper Iris

The Iris Fulva is commonly called the “copper iris” because of the lovely copper color of its flower petals. Each delicate petal has a crease down the center, which makes them resemble arched leaves. And, unlike other types of irises, there are six petals, not five. So although there are only a few flowers that bloom at a time on this plant during the spring and summer seasons, they make quite the stunning display. What aids in their striking appearance is their mature height of about 31 inches, which they reach in a single growing season, and the way that they spread out rapidly through their rhizome system of roots? For the most part, the sources are an average color of gray or green. But sometimes, when they are dug up to be divided after they start to take over a garden plot, they have a hint of the same copper color of the leaves. On top of this, the bright green leaves are just as tall as the straight flower stems. They spread out in a somewhat flat, fan-like shape that stretches from the top of the roots though. Growing copper irises isn't tricky. In fact, they can sometimes be found out in the wild near undisturbed ditches and quiet streams and riverbanks that are not prone to flooding. This is mainly due to the constant wash of nutrition and moisture that these places provide. So those who want to raise these lovely flowers in their gardens at home successfully can do so by ensuring that they stay watered daily. They also need several hours of direct sunlight a day and an acidic soil content with a pH of about 6.5. Fertilize them in the spring and fall. And remember, they are hardy in zones 3-10. But since they prefer a warm environment the most, those who have any doubts about their survival through a harsh winter can bring them inside in a pot during the cold months of the year.

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