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Cinna Arundinacea- Wood Reedgrass

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Wood Reedgrass is not like lawn grass. It is usually found in wetlands as it prefers moist, wet soil. It can tolerate any soil texture if it is a rich, moist, organic loamy type of ground.

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$5.99
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Cinna Arundinacea- Wood Reedgrass


Present throughout Canada and the Eastern United States, Wood Reedgrass is regarded as a tall, attractive plant. As part of the Grass family, its green foliage is spongy with a medium texture to it. It grows upright and prefers to grow in bunches. Wood Reedgrass is not like lawn grass. It is usually found in wetlands as it prefers moist, wet soil. It can tolerate any soil texture if it is a vibrant, moist, organic loamy type of ground. When found in a non-wetland setting invariably it is growing in a damp area. It prefers dappled sun as it is tolerant to partial shade. It survives cold winters reaching temperatures of -33 degrees Fahrenheit. This plant is native to Canada and the United States but is seldom found in the Western region of the United States. Growth occurs at a moderate rate, but it has a long lifespan. At maturity, it reaches its maximum height range of about three to five feet. Physical characteristics include long, narrow leaf blades that grow as long as 12 inches and span a half inch. Its roots reach a minimum of 16 inches down. This perennial plant produces green flowers in the summer and yellow seeds that end in the fall. It only reproduces using seeds or sprigs. In the fall, the flowered grain-like stalk ripens to a tan or golden-brown color. While it is fire resistant, it does not fare well in drought conditions or fire. Overall, it is a hardy plant that needs a low amount of water. It grows actively in the spring and has a slow regrowth process. It lives in river or stream floodplains, swamps, forests, shorelines of lakes or rivers, marshes and along the edges of wetlands. Its fibrous roots protect against soil erosion and work well in a stormwater basin setting. It provides cover, food, nesting and housing for songbirds and wildlife. Grazing animals consider the Wood Reedgrass to be a delicacy and devour it whenever they can. The Iroquois used this plant to treat diabetes.

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