150 Types of  Viburnums that you can plant

150 Types of Viburnums that you can plant

Posted by Tammy Sons on Aug 14 , 2017

Viburnums are a species of over 150 types of shrubs or trees that are well known for having colorful flowers ranging from white to pink and foliage turning from dark green to a range of fall colors. 

Many of the species of viburnum are native to North America making them easy to grow, and other species can be found in South East Asia and South America. 

The viburnum is a favorite shrub for yards and gardens because of the long period of shows ranging from flowering in spring through to the fruits and fall foliage that add interest to a yard. 

Viburnums range in size from smaller species of around three feet up to larger shrubs reaching heights and widths of up to 20 feet; because of their growth levels, viburnums are often used as screening and windbreaks around borders a yard.

The Arrowwood, Viburnum Dentatum, is a popular shrub often used as a border for a yard because of the whole multi-stemmed nature of the plant. Growing to heights and widths between five and nine feet, the Arrowwood begins providing interest in a yard with white flowers appearing during the Spring between May and June. The shrub grows best in partial shade, but the Arrowwood will also tolerate whole sun areas growing; during the Fall, the white flowers are replaced by fruits that turn from green to a red, blue color that attracts birds and other wildlife.

A larger species of viburnum is the Possumhaw. Viburnum nudum can grow up to 10 feet high and wide in partial and complete sun areas of a yard. The Possumhaw is native to the eastern and southern regions of the U.S. and is often confused with more giant trees, such as the dogwood. This species of viburnum tolerate some periods of drought but grows best in soils that are moist and well-drained. Possumhaw flowers attract birds and butterflies because of their bright white coloring and large amounts of nectar growing from arrow-shaped leaves in a V around the flower buds.

Viburnum Lentago, better known as the Nannyberry, grows too large, around 14 feet in height and 12 feet in width. They are often used in borders to provide privacy from neighbors and high traffic areas—the Nannyberry flowers white blooms in the Spring that later turn into red and blue fruits. Nannyberry fruits are a source of food for birds and animals and were often eaten by Native Americans.

A minor form of viburnum is the Maple leaf viburnum that grows up to six feet tall and four feet wide. Like most other forms of viburnum, the Maple Leaf sees its tiny white flowers turn into dark blue and black fruits. This low-growing shrub performs well when placed in a group of other trees and shrubs to provide a decorative, screened border for a yard.

Source to Buy Viburnum 

https://www.tnnursery.net