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Shade

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Top Tree Choices For Shade


Maple Trees - Acer

Hardy in zones 5-9, maple trees grow an average of 1 foot per year until they reach an adult height of 50 and 40 feet wide. Maple trees make an ideal shade tree and prefer moist soil, but will adapt most soil conditions.
The leaves turn brilliant shades of orange and yellow in fall.

Oak Trees - Quercus

Hardy in zone 4-10, oak trees are hardwood, deciduous trees that are prized for shade, fall foliage and furniture making. Oak trees will grow about 1 foot per year until the tree reaches a mature height of 80 and a spread of 100 feet. The average life span of this shade tree is 75 years.
This attractive tree produces acorns that attract wildlife. Fall foliage color is deep red.

Shade Trees

The primary role of shade trees is to produce shade in the landscape. The size of the scene or structure where shade is needed should determine the size of the selected shade trees.
Height and spread of trees vary greatly, ranging from 10 -100 tall and equally as wide. Soil and sun requirements differ between the tree species, and research should be done to determine which shade tree is best suited to a particular landscape.
Some species of trees offer spring flowers, most are deciduous and provide colorful fall foliage.

Large Canopy Trees

The larger the canopy (top, green portion) a tree has, the more shade it will provide. Taller trees will also provide more shade than shorter trees.
Oaks and maples are favorite large canopy trees. Both of these trees grow fast, provide a large limb spread for shade and provide colorful fall foliage.
Deciduous large canopy trees will help reduce heating and cooling costs. The shade provided in summer cools structures and surrounding landscape, and the fall leaf drop allows the sun to shine through in the winter to provide warmth.