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Orange Blooming Perennials

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Orange Blooming Perennials have the tendency to brighten any garden or landscape

Orange Daylilies are well-known for their vibrant, orange blooms that you can sometimes see growing along roadsides around the country. It is an extremely hardy, adaptable perennial that does well in most any type of soil, whether in the sun or shady gardens. They will grow around 48” tall and up to 20-24” wide, so when planted, they need their space to reproduce. Butterflies and hummingbirds love them. However, they require little to no maintenance. Besides its deep orange trumpet of color, it also has long slender leaves and works wonderfully in adding texture and color to a flower bed, borders, or natural area.

Orange Blooming Perennials are often used in Fall decorations

The foliage of the Spotted Touch-Me-Not is a darker green and looks fantastic as the orange blossoms start to appear. Jewelweed is a type of impatiens that forms a beautifully bright orange bloom. It has a small, pouch-like flower with a long spur in the middle and oval-shaped leaves. This annual flower is self-seeding and typically grows two to five feet in height. Seedlings will sprout in early spring, and flowering begins in mid-summer until the first frost. Though insects or hummingbirds must cross-pollinate their attractive orange flowers, they also have flowers that never open. These flowers will fertilize themselves without another flower.

Orange Blooming Perennials are very low maintenance

The flowers of the Turk's Cap Lily are orange with spots of maroon and bloom at the peak of summer in July. This flower attracts hummingbirds in the summer months. Another positive thing about this healthy plant is how resistant it is to diseases. It is extremely rare for this plant to be bothered by viruses and illnesses.

Trumpet Vine - Campsis radicans

The Campsis radicans, known by a variety of names, is most commonly called the Trumpet Vine. The flowering plant was initially been found in eastern regions of the United States, but today is cultivated in western areas of the U.S., as far north as Ontario, and parts of Europe and Central and South America.

 

The deciduous vine can reach lengths approaching 33 feet or more, with small, elliptical leaves. The leaves that darken from an emerald tint into a deep, forest green, rarely grow to more than a few centimeters. The Trumpet Vine's defining characteristic is its bright orange or red flower, trumpet-shaped with a yellow-lined interior, that appears at the tail end of the warm season. The dazzling color of the flower was eye-catching even to the early settlers of the North American continent, with colonists from Virginia transplanting the vine back to England as far back as the 1600s.

 

Naturally growing in wooded settings and along riverbanks, the Trumpet Vine is now a popular addition in gardening and bird-watching. The colorful bell of the flower attracts the attention of hummingbirds, while a dense, thick covering of the vines is a popular nesting site for birds of all kinds. The vine is hardy too, ravenously so, and can quickly overtake its surroundings, not limited to other vegetation. Trumpet Vines have been known to devour fences, poles, and whole trees when left to their own devices. Fortunately, the pruning, necessary to keep the vine controlled, is the only maintenance the beautiful plant requires.

 

Trumpet Vines prefer warmer climates but will survive in northern areas, though the flowers in those regions tend towards the smaller side. After the flowering season, the Trumpet Vine produces seed pods that harden and split, releasing hundreds of tiny seeds. Additionally, when the weather warms, the vine's tendrils will begin to creep, latching on to surrounding surfaces. As long the growth of these vines is checked, they are an incredible addition to any garden or landscape.

 

 

Trumpet Vine - Campsis radicans

 

 

The Campsis radicans, known by a variety of names, is most commonly called the Trumpet Vine. The flowering plant was initially been found in eastern regions of the United States, but today is cultivated in western areas of the U.S., as far north as Ontario, and parts of Europe and Central and South America.

 

 

 

The deciduous vine can reach lengths approaching 33 feet or more, with small, elliptical leaves. The leaves that darken from an emerald tint into a deep, forest green, rarely grow to more than a few centimeters. The Trumpet Vine's defining characteristic is its brilliant orange or red flower, trumpet-shaped with a yellow-lined interior, that appears at the tail end of the warm season. The dazzling color of the flower was eye-catching even to the early settlers of the North American continent, with colonists from Virginia transplanting the vine back to England as far back as the 1600s.

 

 

 

Naturally growing in wooded settings and along riverbanks, the Trumpet Vine is now a popular addition in gardening and bird-watching. The colorful bell of the flower attracts the attention of hummingbirds, while a dense, thick covering of the vines is a popular nesting site for birds of all kinds. The vine is hardy too, ravenously so, and can quickly overtake its surroundings, not limited to other vegetation. Trumpet Vines have been known to devour fences, poles, and whole trees when left to their own devices. Fortunately, the pruning, necessary to keep the vine controlled, is the only maintenance the beautiful plant requires.

 

 

 

Trumpet Vines prefer warmer climates but will survive in northern areas, though the flowers in those regions tend towards the smaller side. After the flowering season, the Trumpet Vine produces seed pods that harden and split, releasing hundreds of tiny seeds. Additionally, when the weather warms, the vine's tendrils will begin to creep, latching on to surrounding surfaces. As long the growth of these vines is checked, they are an incredible addition to any garden or landscape.

Orange Daylily

Hemerocallis Fulva means "Beauty for a Day."

Other names: common daylily, tawny daylily, fulvous daylily, Eve's thread

 

Hardy to -20 F

Soil pH 6.1 – 7.8

Grows in full to part sun

Tolerates almost any soil

Plant one inch deep

 

This hardy, herbaceous perennial has many green, waxy-coated, linear leaves with parallel veins. The leaves are from one to three feet long, tapering to a point. From the midst of the leaves, tall, stout stems grow from 16 to 59 inches tall with spikes of 10 to 20 buds. Buds are pale green to green-orange. They open one at a time, successively, from the bottom of the peak or scape. So while named "Beauty for a Day," because each flower lasts about 24 hours, the plant itself flowers over weeks.

 

The flowers range from two to four inches across with six orange tepals (three petals and three sepals) united at the base. Orange petals have a pale central line. This lily does not grow from a bulb; roots are a thickened mass (tuberose) with rhizomes. They are easy to plant and are widely grown in temperate areas.

 

If the plants are crowded after four or five years, they should be divided. Wait until after they have bloomed for the season. Dig them up using a knife or spade to separate the clump of roots. Throw out any diseased plants or small ones. Cut back the foliage to about two inches. Replant the roots in compost amended soil a few inches apart.

 

If you are growing these in a more northern climate where autumn temperatures get cold, you should consider separating the roots in early spring rather than late summer.

 

The flowers and buds are nontoxic to human; they are cooked and eaten in the Orient. Rhizomes can be chopped and cooked like potatoes. The tuberose roots can be eaten raw or roasted, and they are said to have nutlike flavor.

 

Turks Cap Lily – Lilium superbum

 

Turks Cap Lillies often called Martagon lilies, grow well in full sun and partial shade as well as full shade. However, when grown in full shade, the number of blooms will be reduced. Turks Cap grows from a bulb, typically planted in the fall. The bulb is white, and new plants may sprout from the bulb. The plant contains seed pods with three lobes that are oval in appearance. The lobes contain stacks of thin, lightweight seeds that can easily be carried by the wind. Plants can also be grown from these seeds.

 

Turks Cap grows from four to six feet tall. The leaves, some as large as six inches long, grow in whorls on the stem and are lance-shaped. There are usually from three to nine, and they feel somewhat stiff. Other leaves can appear on the upper stem in pairs or alternating. Orange blooms dappled with purple are the most common type, although they can range from white to a deep burgundy.

 

The flowers grow above the leaves and are generally from 2.5 to 4 inches wide with six sepals. The blooms and sepals curve and touch the stem forming a "Turk's cap," thus the name. Plants may have one flower or as many as twelve. At the base of the blooms, some stamens are a half-inch or longer, and the stamens have anthers that contain pollen, ranging in color from reddish-brown to black. Turks Cap blooms do not produce a noticeable scent. Certain types of more abundant butterflies mainly pollinate Turks Cap.

 

Turks Cap often grows in the wild and can be grown from Massachusetts to the southern Gulf Coast. They prefer moist, well-draining soil. Bulbs should be planted from 12 to 24 inches apart and 4 to 6 inches deep. Turks Cap blooms can be seen from early summer to the middle of summer, usually lasting about a month.