Indian Grass

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$3.59
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
Color
Not Available,
Bloom Season
Not Available,
Usage
Flower Gardens And Beds, Hedges And Privacy,
Usage
Flower Gardens And Beds, Hedges And Privacy,
Ships
Year Round
Height At Maturity
Under 10 Feet
Exposure
Full Sun,
Categories
Native Grasses
Bare Root

We ship bare-root plants which are dormant (in a wintertime state) and have no pretty foliage, blooms, or greenery but they will bloom out in the following spring after they are planted and be beautiful.This is why we offer a 1 year warranty to show our customers their plants will thrive come spring.

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Shipping Information

We dig fresh our plants and ship immediately. We ship US Mail, Priority shipping. You will receive a tracking number once your plants ship. All plants will be fine in their packages for up to 3 days after receiving.

How We Protect Your Plants For Transit

We sell only bare root plants. We dip the roots in tera-sorb silicone gel to retain ample moisture for transit and surround with plastic. This is superior protection for plants in transit for up to 12 days.

Upon Receipt Of Your Plants

Open your plants and inspect the same day received. We offer 3 days to report any problems with your order. Bare root plants need to be planted within 2-3 days of receiving unless weather-related problems prohibit planting. Store in a cool place and keep roots moist and covered with plastic until they can be planted. Water for the first week daily after planting.

Shipping Dates
Ships Year Round

Description

Indian Grass is a common feature along the plains of the United States -- and, today, it is frequently used as a hardy, perennial decorative Grass. When allowed to grow wild, Indian Grass can quickly cover a large prairie. Indian Grass can be planted either as sod (to cover ground) or in clumps (to form decorative borders, screens, or hedgerows).

Creating a Native Garden with Indian Grass

Indian Grass is frequently used throughout the United States as a native, non-invasive species. Indian Grass is very easy to care for; it can grow in almost any soil, grow from full sun to partial shade, and needs regular watering. It is found natively throughout much of the Midwest, growing wild. These grasses can grow up to six feet high and, as a perennial, will return season after season. Because they are a type of Grass, they can also start to spread.

Indian Grass is frequently used to offset other, more vibrant additions to gardens. It can be used as a "filler plant," and it is low maintenance enough to be planted throughout a garden en masse. It will re-seed, and it is liked by many grazing animals, which may be a consideration for those who have deer or rabbits in their area.

Taking Care of Indian Grass

When Indian Grass is established in native areas, it requires very minimal care. It should be watered as it establishes itself, but it should only require as much watering as a regular lawn once it is established. It can be planted against other plants to improve the aeration of the soil and the run of the water. It does best in well-drained areas but can also grow in floodplain prairies and low elevation areas.

If your Indian Grass is over-watered, it may start to brown. It should still be in well-drained soil -- and it should be in full sun or partial sun. Otherwise, you may need to trim your Indian Grass back periodically.

How to Plant Indian Grass

Indian Grass can be planted as a seed if it's going to be grown into the sod. It can also be planted as an already established clump if it's going to be used decoratively. It will continue to grow upward as long as it is allowed to do so, which means you should consider how tall you want it to grow. It will grow as tall as a person if allowed to, but it can be continually trimmed down if desired. Once planted, it should be thoroughly watered until it has been established. Every spring, the Grass will start to grow again.

Indian Grass is frequently used in natural, native gardens to add decoration without increasing maintenance time. Though it doesn't require a lot of work, it should still be checked and trimmed back to avoid taking over its territory—pair Indian Grass with other native plants and flowering plants to create a well-balanced and non-invasive garden.