White Snakeroot

White Snakeroot

Posted by Tammy Sons on 3rd Apr 2018

White Snakeroot - Ageratina altissima

White Snakeroot has many aliases, but none are probably more appropriate due to the color and poisonous nature of this perennial herb. Richchweed, White Sanicle, or Tall Boneset are some of its many other names. At its peak, White Snakeroot it can reach anywhere between about 1 1/2 - 3 foot in height with stems which cover various shades from tan to light green. The leaves on White Snakeroot are hardy which average dimensions of approximately 5" x 3 1/2", and they begin to lessen in an area as they work their way up the stems. The plant is indigenous to eastern and central North America where it holds a preference of partial sun to light shade. It is a hardy plant which does well in moist or even slightly dry soil, and they take exceptionally well to soil with loam or its variants in the vicinity. For example, a mixture with a little clay-loam involved will be an ideal growing environment.

The only primary care that White Snakeroot calls for is to keep it out of the intense sun or drought-like situations. If that is something that the perennial is exposed to, then it is likely that the leaves will wilt and turn a shade of yellow which is indeed not as pleasant to look at as its natural and healthy color. In the wild, these are especially common in woodland environments. Tremetol is the toxin that they contain, and it is passed on through a host animal such as cattle where it may be present in milk and meat if they have been grazing on the plant. Otherwise, it is nice looking with white flowers that blossom into a beautiful white which can complement many other accessory plants. They are easy to maintain and survive well in most gardens.