Moss Gardens

Moss Gardens

Posted by Tammy Sons on 1st Oct 2018

Moss Gardens

When people think of green lawns, most will envision a thick carpet of grass covering their yards. In the past decade, this type of ground cover has become more and more unsustainable because the use of water has become regulated especially during summer months. This is why more and more gardeners are exploring the possibilities offered by moss gardens, and many will find that nurseries usually have different types of moss for sale.

Benefits of Growing Moss in Your Garden

If you want a manicured lawn with a thick carpet of grass, you would need to make sure you have full sun – something necessary to keep the grass green and healthy. Because of this, grass lawns also need a lot of water. On the other hand, people who use moss do not have to deal with this balancing act, and that is only one of the many benefits you get from cultivating a garden of moss instead of grass.

  • If you grow moss, you won’t have to cut any of your trees; moss will thrive perfectly in a shady lawn. To determine where you can start developing your new ground cover, look at the shaded, bald spots in your garden. Give these areas good dowsing of water and see if some moss will naturally sprout.
  • Moss does not need as much water as grass. Although moss is to be kept well watered, its requirement is substantially less than what popular grass varieties need. Depending on the type of moss you plant, sprinkling your moss lawn for 2 to 5 minutes twice daily is ordinarily sufficient for proper hydration.
  • You have a wide selection of textures when you use moss. If you visit a nursery with moss for sale, you will find that moss comes in various shapes and forms. While most lawns covered with grass look untidy when several types of grass are used, moss lends itself to being used in creative combinations. For example, you can plant reindeer moss in a part of your garden that has somewhat more sunlight, Irish moss in an area that has more shade, and Hypnum moss in large flat areas where a more delicate texture would be appropriate.
  • Moss can grow well even if the soil is less than ideal. It can thrive in acidic or alkaline soil, and because it does not have a deep root system, it can do well even on the rocky ground. Reindeer moss, for example, can grow against rocks for as long as it has sufficient drainage, moisture, and sunlight. Other types of moss, such as Irish moss, need well-drained soil but can be spread on rocks in shady parts of the garden.
  • Moss gardens have a soft, aged, ambiance that neatly manicured lawns do not always have. If you plan to use moss to cover a part of your garden, explore the idea of using several varieties instead of just one, and you will be enchanted by the jewel-like shades of green that will greet you each morning.