Evergreen Conifers For Zone 9

Evergreens

Evergreen Hedges
Hedges are often used as borders or property demarcation lines, protecting yards or gardens. Besides lasting year-round, evergreen hedges have several advantages over deciduous ones. They offer year-round protection, but are also easier to grow than deciduous hedges, requiring less pruning or training. They also require less water and less composting.

Evergreen hedges tend to give an excellent impression of the property, presenting nicely when pruned into attractive shapes. While they do create a boundary, they also retain a green, natural look that a fence cannot provide.

Many different types of evergreen plants can make up evergreen hedges. For maximum resilience to disease and insects, it’s a good idea to use more than one variety.

A partial list of the varieties that make excellent privacy hedges includes: Holly (Ilex), Firethorn (Pyracantha coccinea), Privet (Ligustrum vulgare), Boxwood (Buxus), Yew (Taxus baccata), Green Giant Hybrid Arborvitae (Thuja plicata x standishii), Leyland Cyprus (Cupressus x leylandii) and Heavenly Bamboo (Nandina domestic). While these vary in growth rates from the slow-growing Holly to the fast-growing Leyland Cyprus, all make beautiful hedges that with a little care, will last for years.

Buxus Sempervirens Boxwood
Buxus sempervirens is commonly known as boxwood shrubs. This bush grows in U.S. Department of Agriculture hardiness zones six through eight. These shrubs are native to Asia and southern Europe. An evergreen, boxwood shrubs grow in a compact form that creates a formal garden hedge when planted in a row. The foliage is a dense, fine texture that is dark green. Use these low-growing shrubs to accent flower gardens, paths or doorways. Boxwood shrubs do well in containers for patios and areas where a potted plant is desired.

These shrubs grow in full sun and tolerate partial shade. Plant in a rich, well-drained soil that is slightly moist. The shrubs reach heights of 15 to 20 feet, with growth that reaches down to the soil line. The nondescript yellow flowers that appear in the spring have a pleasant scent.

Boxwoods are drought-tolerant and transplant easily to another area of the landscape. Prune to form the shrubs and control size. Mulch the shrubs to maintain moisture in the soil.