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Chasmanthium Latifolium- Northern Sea Oats

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Chasmanthium Latifolium is a perennial ornamental grass known by the common names of Northern Sea Oats or Indian Woodoats. The plant grows in USDA plant hardiness zones 3 through 8 in the Eastern United States and Northern Mexico.

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Here's how your plants will look on arrival. All plants are dormant with no leaves or foliage.
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Chasmanthium Latifolium- Northern Sea Oats

 

Chasmanthium Latifolium is a perennial ornamental grass known by the common names of Northern Sea Oats or Indian Woodoats. The plant grows in USDA plant hardiness zones 3 through 8 in the Eastern United States and Northern Mexico. The height of grass varies between 2 feet and 5 feet, depending on growing conditions. Northern Sea Oats typically prefer fertile and moist soils but will grow in thinner soils. Its tolerance for wetness makes it a good candidate for plantings along streams although it will do well along woodland edges or on rocky slopes if moisture is sufficient.

Northern Sea Oats grow in clumps of 1 to 2-1/2 feet in width with long stems that produce many long grass leaves at various intervals along the stem. Leaves droop and arch slightly toward the ground. Leaf color depends on sun exposure. Plants in shadier areas produce darker green foliage whereas full-sun plantings have brighter yellowish green growth. Generally, the plant wants full sun but shows above-average tolerance for part shade, which supports its suitability in woodland environments.

During August and September, green flowers bloom from the stalks. The small flowers grow in flat clusters with points at the end of each flower segment. They somewhat resemble agricultural oats. Flowers droop from thin stems growing off the top of the central stalk. Flowers and mature seed heads are known for rustling in even slight breezes.

Northern Sea Oats provide additional color in fall when flowers turn purplish, and the leaves shift from green to bronze. Clumps of grass dull to a brown color in winter. This species adds interest to dormant winter landscapes. Chasmanthium Latifolium requires little maintenance except for cutting down the clumps in early spring. This grass spreads quickly by seed and represents an excellent choice for naturalizing open landscapes or filling in borders and property lines.

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