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Carex Lurida- Lurid Sedge

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Carex lurida (Lurida Sedge) is a hardy perennial native to southern Canada (from Ontario to Newfoundland and Labrador) and much of the United States. The wetland grasses of this perennial sedge grow in fountain-like tufts of tightly clustered stems.

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Carex Lurida- Lurid Sedge 

Carex lurida (Lurida Sedge) is a hardy perennial native to southern Canada (from Ontario to Newfoundland and Labrador) and much of the United States. The wetland grasses of this perennial sedge grow in fountain-like tufts of tightly clustered stems from the plant's rhizomes. The arching leaves atop the stems have a channel that runs its entire length, making it easier to distinguish it from other similar sedges. The blooms match the yellowish-green color of the plant until the seed head appears which is tan in color. They are oblong and covered in multiple bristles. People often liken the flowers of Carex lurida to the fruits of the Liquidambar styraciflua (American Sugargum) tree. The flowers appear between June and August. These grasses are found in sedge meadows, swamps, bordering marshes, seeps, lakes, and ponds. They are often used for soil retention and wetland restoration as they can tolerate a variety of soils as well as seasonal floodings. They prefer soils with a pH of 4.9 to 6.8. They thrive in USDA growing zones 2-9 and requires full to partial sun. At full maturity, Carex lurida reaches approximately three feet tall and up to 2 feet wide. When planting, allow for one foot of space between each plant. This species is resistant to a variety of pests and animals. It is also known to attract a variety of birds, moths, and butterflies; including Sedge Wrens and Eyed Brown butterflies. This sedge has multiple common names. It is often called lurid sedge due to its stunning yellowish-green color of the foliage and seed bristles. Others refer to it as sallow sedge, again referencing its yellow-ish green tone. Shallow sedge is another frequently referenced common name for this sedge, likely referencing the species' ability to thrive in shallow waters.

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