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Rudbeckia Hirta- Black-Eyed Susan

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Black-eyed Susans are very drought-resistant and can thrive in almost any environment, but they don't like wet soil that doesn't have good drainage.

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$5.99
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Rudbeckia Hirta- Black-Eyed Susan

An iconic wildflower, the Black-eyed Susan is a spot of sunshine in any open field. Known also as the Gloriosa or Ox-eye Daisy, Rudbeckia Hirta has 25 varieties that grow in every state of North America. Although it is widely known as a prairie flower, it has been the State Flower and emblem of Maryland since 1918. The flower looks like a yellow-orange diary with a brown center, but it is actually part of the aster family and related to the sunflower. In fact, it looks like a mini sunflower with a single row of petals rather than several. They can grow up to three feet high, with two- to three-inch flower heads, and have rough, hairy leaves and stems. Part of their name, hirta, is the Latin word for hairy. This is one of the ways you can distinguish them from the very similar-looking orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida) and the Rudbeckia spp, which looks nearly identical but has a shorter growing season. The sunflower grows wild in every state east of the Rocky Mountains, and it can often be found along road sides, and in fields, meadows, and dry flatlands. It is a hearty flower that conservationists use to restore prairie lands, and it can even re-seed itself quite aggressively. Black-eyed Susans are very drought-resistant and can thrive in almost any environment, but they don't like wet soil that doesn't have good drainage. The oblong, bright petals attract butterflies and beneficial insects when in bloom, and the seed heads are a favorite of finches and regional birds. This biannual perennial has a very long growing season and will return year after year. Black-eyed Susans are indigenous to the United States and have a long history in Native folklore and medicine. The roots were used by Native Americans and folk medicine as a treatment for colds.

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