Rudbeckia Hirta- Black-Eyed Susan

(No reviews yet) Write a Review
Shipping:
Calculated at Checkout
$11.99
Bloom Color
Yellow,
Bloom Season
Spring, Fall,
Bloom Season
Spring, Fall,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11,
Height At Maturity
Under 3 Feet
Ships
Year Round
Exposure
Full Sun,
Usage
Flowering, Drought Tolerant Plants, Flower Gardens & Beds,
Usage
Flowering, Drought Tolerant Plants, Flower Gardens & Beds,
Usage
Flowering, Drought Tolerant Plants, Flower Gardens & Beds,

Reviews (0)

Currently there are zero reviews for this product.

Helpful Gardening Tips

Goes Well With

Shipping

Shipping Information

We ship all plants usps priority mail. They arrive to most locations within 2-3 days. We package all plants to retain moisture to up to 10 days in transit. All plants ships from our warehouses in Tennessee. All plants are grown and shipped from out Altamont (zip) 37301 location. We do drop ship for re-sellers also for those wanting to resell our plants.

How We Protect Your Plants For Transit

All plants are dug and immediately taken to our warehouse and tera-sorb moisture retention gel is applied to the roots and then wrapped in plastic to retain superior moisture for transit. They are placed in corogated cardboard shipping boxes for protection when shipped

Upon Receipt Of Your Plants

Upon receipt of your plants, unpack and unwrap the roots and mist with water. Plant within 24-48 hours. If you can not plant within this time frame, put your plants in a cool location (ex- basement, garage or cellar) and water the roots daily. Cover them back up with the plastic so they will not dry out until you can plant them. After planted, water every evening after the sun goes down for 5 days.

Shipping Dates
Ships Year Round

Description

Rudbeckia Hirta- Black-Eyed Susan

An iconic wildflower, Rudbeckia Hirta- Black-Eyed Susan is a spot of sunshine in any open field. Known also as the Gloriosa or Ox-eye Daisy, Rudbeckia Hirta has 25 varieties that grow in every state of North America. Although it is widely known as a prairie flower, it has been the State Flower and emblem of Maryland since 1918. The flower looks like a yellow-orange diary with a brown center, but it is actually part of the aster family and related to the sunflower. In fact, it looks like a mini sunflower with a single row of petals rather than several. They can grow up to three feet high, with two- to three-inch flower heads, and have rough, hairy leaves and stems.

Part of their name, hirta, is the Latin word for hairy. This is one of the ways you can distinguish them from the very similar-looking orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida) and the Rudbeckia spp, which looks nearly identical but has a shorter growing season.

The sunflower grows wild in every state east of the Rocky Mountains, and it can often be found along road sides, and in fields, meadows, and dry flatlands. It is a hearty flower that conservationists use to restore prairie lands, and it can even re-seed itself quite aggressively. Black-eyed Susans are very drought-resistant and can thrive in almost any environment, but they don't like wet soil that doesn't have good drainage. The oblong, bright petals attract butterflies and beneficial insects when in bloom, and the seed heads are a favorite of finches and regional birds. This biannual perennial has a very long growing season and will return year after year. Black-eyed Susans are indigenous to the United States and have a long history in Native folklore and medicine. The roots were used by Native Americans and folk medicine as a treatment for colds.

Rudbeckia Hirta- Black-Eyed Susan

 

Goes Great With