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Andropogon Glomeratus- Bushy Beard

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The USDA Hardiness Zones for bushy beardgrass is 5 to 10. It is found in the eastern and southern states, and as far west as California. This perennial marsh plant tolerates heat well. It has a moderate growing speed, with its active growth happening

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$5.99
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Andropogon Glomeratus- Bushy Beard

The Andropogon Glomeratus, colloquially called “Bushy Beardgrass,” is a wildland grass native to the Americas. It thrives in low-lying, moist areas with full sun exposure, such as grasslands. The USDA Hardiness Zones for bushy beardgrass is 5 to 10. It is found in the eastern and southern states, and as far west as California. This perennial marsh plant tolerates heat well. It has a moderate growing speed, with its active growth happening in the summer. Finch, junco, and tree sparrow eat the seeds, and white-tailed deer and rabbits browse the plant. This grass grows in bunches and is a low maintenance plant. Bushy beardgrass can grow in soil ranging from fine to coarse. In addition to moisture, it requires between 5.0 and 6.3 pH. It has a high anaerobic tolerance but does not tolerate salinity or calcium carbonate well. Bushy beardgrass can reach about 6 feet at its fully matured height. Leaves of this grass are simple linear blades that run parallel to the stem. The leaves are greenish-blue, turning coppery in the fall and dropping off in winter. Bushy beardgrass is distinct from other warm season grasses with its thick, massive, reddish brown, flowering clumps and its flattened blue-green foliage. The grass stems stand erect and compressed. They have overlapping sheaths along the bottom portion of the stem. The stems are flat tufts that form in clumps, encased in a creamy bloom. The sheaths are occasionally covered with long shaggy hairs. The flowering has a dense and feathery appearance. Bushy beardgrass blooms in late summer when it produces its distinct white flowers. These flowers attach directly to the stem, congregating towards the top of the stem, equidistant from each other. The spikelet blooms are downy with fine, silky hairs. The bushy beardgrass drops its seeds in the late fall, as is characteristic of grasses.